It’s a difficult question, and it doesn’t have a simple answer.

Why do more women abort their unborn babies than make an adoption plan, especially when so many other women who want to have children are unable to? 

Today, families typically spend tens of thousands of dollars on infant adoptions and often wait two or three years to finally welcome a child into their home. Though exact data is difficult to find, numbers suggest that there are up to 36 couples waiting for every one baby placed for adoption in the U.S. Even families who seek to adopt older children or children with special needs often struggle with adoption expenses and long waits.

At the same time as these families wait and struggle, abortions destroy about 1.1 million unborn babies’ lives every year in the U.S. Unfortunately, our modern society’s first solution for women facing an unplanned or difficult pregnancy often is abortion.

Writing for The Federalist, Paula Rinehart reflected on the troubling situation:

 You have to wonder what went through the minds of thousands of families waiting to adopt a baby as they listened to Illyse Hogue brag about her decision to have an abortion in graduate school. It just wasn’t a convenient time to be a mother, she explained, as the Democratic National Convention cheered. 
 Nearly two million infertile couples in the United States are actively trying to adopt a child. Each of those hopeful couples would give their right arm for the privilege of parenting children—like Hogue’s—whose lives are being ended prematurely by a scalpel or a pill. 
 Since the dawn of time there have been pregnant women who could not parent the child in their wombs, and there have been infertile couples longing for a family. Never has it been harder to bring those two parties together—birth mother and adoptive parents. The basic problem is the growing scarcity of babies due to culture of abortion.

Adoption is not an easy decision for birth mothers, and the abortion industry knows it. Both abortion and adoption can lead to intense grief, guilt and stress for biological mothers because of the loss of their child. Pregnancy centers report that few women choose to make adoption plans for their babies. Most only consider abortion and parenting because of the fear and pain of “giving up” their child.

Abortion facilities play into these fears, though through the guise of offering “options counseling.” Abortion is what makes them money; adoption does not. So, women often are deceived into aborting their unborn babies, falling prey to the abortion industry’s claims that abortion will be easier and less painful than adoption – and often realizing too late that their unborn baby’s life is destroyed forever.

The abortion industry does not exist to empower women to make choices, as it claims. It exists to sell abortions. Planned Parenthood’s mission isn’t to help women choose when to become parents, as the name implies. If it was, the abortion giant would offer infertility treatments, adoption assistance and parenting support just as often as it does abortion. Instead, it does more abortions than any other group in the United States. And now it’s pushing for more tax dollars – not for prenatal care or adoption assistance or infertility treatments – but for abortions.

Rinehart concluded:

 In this election season the Democratic National Committee is pushing the most radical abortion agenda ever, shamelessly touting abortion as a positive good. Although most insurances offer not a dime for fertility treatments, the DNC platform insists abortion should be free to the mother—the bill footed by non-consenting taxpayers.
It’s worth remembering that behind the mirage of no-consequences abortion stand thousands and thousands of families with aching, empty arms. Many couples and potential siblings go to sleep at night praying for one—just one—of those babies to take home and love.

None of the decisions surrounding parenting are easy, but neither is life. It’s time that the abortion industry is exposed for its true, profit-driven motives. It does not have the best interests of women or children at heart. It does not care that its business has a ripple effect of suffering, not just on the unborn babies and moms, but on infertile couples, grandparents and so many others. 

Adoption can be a difficult option for birth mothers, but it’s a loving one that brings hope and joy and love to children and families that abortion never could.