Jonathon Van Maren’s first book, The Culture War, is a look at the cultural wreckage wrought by the sexual revolution of the 1960’s and 70’s.  The book offers a broad overview of modern and post-modern phenomena, most notably the dramatic increase in pornography use, that have drastically altered society’s beliefs about the value of the human person.

Van Maren is a pro-life activist with the Canadian Centre for Bioethical Reform, a group that specializes in exposing the graphic reality of abortion through public demonstrations on Canadian university campuses and elsewhere. He writes regularly at his blog the Bridgehead, hosts a radio program, and is an accomplished public speaker.

The first half of The Culture War makes the argument that pre-marital sex and pornography are the primary evils that have ushered in no-fault divorce, the decline of traditional marriage, human trafficking, a rape culture, and abortion on demand. The sexual revolution, Van Maren exposes, was largely founded on the faulty, odious research of Alfred Kinsey and Margaret Mead. It was the deceptive conclusions of these two researchers that shook the foundations of accepted morality and laid the groundwork for the sexual revolution.

Van Maren’s work hits heavy as he paints a bleak picture of destitution and despair. Much of the Western world has become a moral wasteland of death and destruction because people have been treated as commodities to be bought and sold and not the immeasurably valuable creations of God they really are. The widespread killing of human beings through in-vitro fertilization (IVF), euthanasia, assisted suicide, and abortion are the fruits of the sexual revolution, and pornography is the fuel that keeps the deadly mechanism churning out victims.

But it’s not all death and despair in Van Maren’s view. He does offer us a way out, a path forward for our children. A path that can lead to a renewed and life-affirming culture, beginning with a respect for sex as a sacred, life-creating act intended for the confines of marriage between a man and woman.

The Culture War is well-written and not a difficult read. It is on the “heavy” side, as in not cheerful and light, but it is certainly worth the time. It will give you a better understanding of where we are in the culture war, how we got here, and what we can do to improve the world for our progeny moving forward. The Culture War can be purchased online through lifecyclebooks.com.